Recipe: Slow Cooked Zucchini Coins & Herbs!

Comment

Recipe: Slow Cooked Zucchini Coins & Herbs!

Slow-Cooked Zucchini Coins with Chopped Herbs and Crumbled Feta

by Deborah Madison, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, published 1997

(Cook's note - this particular edition is out of print, but is well worth looking for a used one or buying her newer version).

  • 2-3 T olive oil or butter
  • 1-1/2 lbs zucchini, thinly sliced
  • 1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 c chopped mixed herbs - dill, parsley, basil and cilantro (I prefer mint)
  • 1/2 c crumbled feta
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Heat the oil in a wide skillet, then add the zucchini and garlic.  Sprinkle lightly with salt and cook over low heat for 20-30 minutes, stirring every so often.  The finished squash should have a light golden glaze over the surface and be caramelized in places.  Taste for salt and season with pepper.  Toss with the herbs and cheese and serve.

(Cook's note - seems weird to cook zucchini so long, but it gets wonderfully soft and sweet which is a great pairing with the herbs and salty zing of the feta.)

Comment

Article: Sitting

Comment

Article: Sitting

The Least Healthy Thing You Do Every Day

By Lisa Marshall for Men's Journal

Ultrarunner Adam St. Pierre thought he had training down to a science. An exercise physiologist and running coach in Boulder, Colorado, he ran 40 to 70 miles a week, stretched 15 minutes twice a day, and saw a massage therapist twice a month. But at the peak of the 2014 racing season, the 33-year-old athlete was nearly sidelined by tight hip flexors. "The muscles run from your femur up to the pelvis. When they're tight, you lose range of motion and considerable speed, and you feel like you have to pee all the time," he says. That's untenable for an average day, let alone a 100-mile race.

St. Pierre hunted for a solution. He tried Pilates, stretching more, strengthening his core. Still, the pain persisted. Finally, he realized that he'd overlooked one crucial part of his daily routine: The six hours he spent sitting at his desk. "I was doing everything I could to keep my hip flexors loose enough to allow me to run, but I neglected this small, obvious change," says St. Pierre.

He converted his office desk to a standing station and cut his sedentary time in half. In weeks, his hip muscles released. Two months later, he raced a 50-miler in Vermont in his personal-best time of eight hours, 18 minutes. "I felt great," he says. "Since, I've even noticed my chronic low-back pain fade away."

If too much time behind a desk can mess up a hard-core athlete like St. Pierre, imagine the impact it has on the typical guy. That's exactly what experts in the emerging field of inactivity physiology are exploring, and their conclusions may surprise you. Most of us sit 10-plus hours a day, more than we sleep. While we're seated, a lot of bad things happen: Blood sugar rises; muscles become tighter; and blood flow to the heart slows, even in those who exercise regularly. "This is one reason why so many frustrated people can't make big changes in their health," says Marc Hamilton, a professor at Louisiana's Pennington Biomedical Research Center, who has studied inactivity physiology for 20 years. According to Hamilton, your good habits, like working out and eating well, aren't enough. "Something extremely potent is happening in your body in the hours you sit idle," he says.

Imagine a long day in your desk chair. That moment you start to feel lethargic? That's when red blood cells in your legs begin to clump together, thickening inside your vessels and slowing circulation. If, later, you notice a further drop in energy, it's because your body's insulin production is down: The sugars from your morning oatmeal linger in your bloodstream, rather than being ushered into your muscles for energy. Soon a key enzyme (lipase) responsible for vacuuming fat out of the blood deactivates. Small amounts of fat begin to accumulate in your blood; your body will store it in an easy-to-access, central location -- your gut. (One reason it may be tough to shed extra pounds, despite those morning runs.) You may also have hunger cravings, even though you haven't moved. That's because your appetite-regulating hormones leptin and ghrelin have gone off-kilter. Meanwhile, a more subtle physiological change occurs: Deep within your leg muscles, a gene (LPP1) critical for suppressing clotting and inflammation switches off. By the end of the day, even with a lunch break and trips to the water cooler, your good cholesterol and insulin sensitivity may have fallen 20 to 40 percent.

A day, even a week, of this isn't much of a problem. But repeat the process for years, and it's easier to understand this stat: Those who sit the majority of their waking hours -- even if they take breaks and regularly exercise -- have two-and-a-half times the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a 2012 meta-analysis of nearly 800,000 people.

Gym rats don't get a pass, either. In fact, studies consistently show that people who work out often spend more time on their butts than nonexercisers. A recent study found that marathoners sit nearly 11 hours on days they train. Perhaps that's because they believe a workout grants them the right to lounge. (Exercisers are twice as sedentary on the days they hit the gym, research shows.) "It is foolish to think that 30 to 45 minutes of exercise every other day will immunize you from the effects of being sedentary 70 to 80 hours a week," Hamilton says.

Of course, even a focused office drone gets up from his desk to grab food or run an errand. Those things help. A recent Indiana University study compared people who sat for three hours straight with those who got up and walked for five minutes every hour. In the continuous sitters, circulation fell by half, while the walkers saw no dips in blood flow. But five minutes of moving in an hour won't counteract the physiological impacts -- lower insulin sensitivity, higher inflammation -- of sitting for the rest of it. That's like trying to undo a fast-food diet by eating healthy snacks. "Your body is responding to what you're doing over the whole day," Hamilton says.

Sitting's effects can be dramatic on the outside as well, says corrective-exercise specialist Elizabeth Pongo. According to Pongo, here's what happens to the typical nine-to-fiver: The shoulders round and the head settles into a forward tilt; this makes it harder for the lungs to expand and take in air when you're sprinting down a basketball court or running a 5K. That classic office-worker hunch means the humerus (the upper bone in your arm) may be tilted in and lightly grinding into the shoulder socket; now, when you lift weights, you're causing excessive wear and tear on your rotator cuff, cartilage, and joint capsule. All day, your body is "learning" this repetitive slumped-over posture; hip flexors and pecs shorten and tighten, and the glutes weaken, decreasing power and range of motion during squats, lunges, and any activity that requires explosive movement.

Fortunately, the solution is fairly simple. In addition to thinking, "How much will I exercise this week?" ask yourself, "How little will I sit?" Small movements can have a big impact. The experts call it nonexercise activity thermogenesis, or NEAT -- think flexing your calves, stretching, even fidgeting in your chair. All of those movements require energy, and the calories add up, says Mayo Clinic researcher James Levine. Levine tracked workers who wore ultrasensitive movement sensors. His finding: When all other variables were accounted for, the leanest people sat 2.25 fewer hours per day, and engaged in more minor movements that helped them burn 350 more daily calories. "This supports the idea that there is a direct relationship between your NEAT and your ability to stave off weight gain," says Levine.
Companies from Facebook to the Federal Reserve Bank have invested in standing desks, and others have shrunk the size of cubicles to create wider hallways for "walking meetings." In one study by Levine, employees who were outfitted with sit-stand units lowered their sitting time by 91 minutes per day, and boosted NEAT movements by 33 percent. In a classic case of
"you don't know how bad you felt until you feel better," many also reported being more alert and less depressed, not only at work but after they clocked out.

That was the intent of John Folkestad, co-founder of Minneapolis-based financial staffing firm Salo LLC, when he outfitted employees with standing desks. "Frankly, we didn't go into this saying, 'For the sake of our health, we need to stand more,'" says Folkestad. "It was about energy." Which is something he says he has a lot more of now. Before the switch, Folkestad would rise at 5 am five days a week to work out. By 3 pm, he'd hit a wall, and he spent evenings on the couch. Now, having cut his sitting time in half, Folkestad churns through 16-hour days. "It makes sense to me," he says. "A body at rest stays at rest. A body in motion stays in motion."

Your Guide To Sitting Less

1.    Plan by minutes. Cornell ergonomist Alan Hedges recommends 20 minutes sitting, eight minutes standing, two minutes walking. Repeat. The formula also improves productivity and posture, studies show.

2.   Default to a walk. Instead of mulling at your desk when you're drawing a blank, get up and take a 5-minute walk. Research suggests that you'll be 60 percent more creative when you return.

3.   Stand When tired. Make this automatic: If you yawn, stand up. Rising fires the Ascending Reticular Activating System, a network of neurons in the cerebral cortex that enhances alertness.

4.   Shift Your mind-set. Before you take a seat, think of this quote from Mayo Clinic researcher James Levine: "The goal of sitting should be singular: to give our bodies a break from moving."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/20/sitting-most-unhealthy_n_6715734.html

Comment

New Barre Class!

Comment

New Barre Class!

 

ALL NEW!

PILATES BOOTY BARRE

Tuesday at 9:00am and

Wednesday at 6:00pm

 There is no experience required for Pilates Booty Barre. It is a low impact, total body workout. The technique is built around small, controlled, and isometric movements. The program uses a mix of mat work and ballet inspired moves to target the glutes, legs, and abdominals. Have fun while burning calories, and getting long lean muscles at the barre! 

 

Get lean at the barre.

Low-impact.

Fully body routine.

Ballet-inspired moves.

Have fun while sculpting your booty.

 

Call us to let us know you're coming 719.539.4210

Comment

Pilates & Blood Pressure Control

Comment

Pilates & Blood Pressure Control

PILATES MAT TRAINING AND BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL 


Adding to the growing research evidence of the health benefits of Pilates is a new study showing that hypertensive women who practiced mat Pilates experienced a significant reduction in blood pressure. Since resistance exercises benefit people with high blood pressure, researchers from the Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, in Brazil, wanted to evaluate whether Pilates, as a form of resistance exercise, would offer similar reductions in blood pressure. 

Investigators enrolled 44 middle-aged hypertensive women who did not participate in any structured exercise and were taking blood pressure-lowering medications under supervision from their respective doctors. The women were divided into two groups: a control group that did not add any new exercise train­ing during the study period; and a training group that attended a 60-min ute mat Pilates class twice a week for 16 weeks. All subjects underwent blood pressure assessments, among other physical tests, at the beginning of the study and after 16 weeks. 

Data analysis showed that women in the training group experienced a significant reduction in blood pressure during all measurements over a 24-hour period (awake and sleeping). Control group members did not demonstrate any comparable changes in blood pressure. 

Study limitations included the fact that only middle-aged women who wanted to take the training participated. But the authors noted that, in other research, both men and women have responded equally in exercise interventions designed to lower blood pressure. 

The authors consequently recommended "mat Pilates training on a regular basis as a non-drug treatment for the prevention, treatment and control of hypertension, provided that the same will be applied in accordance with the criteria and appropriate care and by a trained and qualified professional for [Pilates mat exercises] and [for people with high blood pressure]."


The research was published in International Journal of Cardiology (2015; 179, 262-68). 

Article from IDEA FITNESS JOURNAL, April 2015

Comment

Busting a Pilates Myth: You need to have good coordination to do Pilates

Comment

Busting a Pilates Myth: You need to have good coordination to do Pilates

Pilates Myth #3 “You need to have good coordination to do Pilates.

Pilates develops coordination, you are not required to have good coordination before you start. Some of our clients come to us after an injury has caused them to lose some coordination and muscle strength. We can start with the simple basics of breath and movement and slowly progress to increase the amount of coordination and balance. Even without an injury most of us have a strong and weak side. Pilates workouts can help balance the muscle use on both sides which in turn, can improve our posture.

By Lisa Marshall for Men's Journal

Comment

Recipe: Crushed Puy (French Green) Lentils with Tahini and Cumin

Comment

Recipe: Crushed Puy (French Green) Lentils with Tahini and Cumin

Crushed Puy (French Green) Lentils with Tahini and Cumin

by Deborah Madison, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, published 1997

  • 1 c lentils
  • 2 T unsalted butter (substitute olive oil for vegan option)
  • 2 T olive oil, plus extra to finish
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 4 medium tomatoes, peeled and cut into 3/8" dice (scant 2 c)
  • 1-2/3 c cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 1/4 c tahini
  • 2 T lemon juice
  • 1/3 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, quartered
  • 1/2 tsp paprika to garnish (optional)
  • salt and black pepper

Bring a saucepan of water to boil.  Add the lentils and cook for 20-30 minutes or until completely cooked.  Drain and set aside.

Put the butter and oil in a large saute pan and place over medium-high heat.  Once the butter melts, add the garlic and cumin and cook for about 1 minute.  Add the tomatoes, 4/5 of the cilantro and the cooked lentils.  Continue to cook and stir for a couple of minutes before adding the tahini, lemon juice, 4-1/2 T water, 1 tsp salt and a good grind of black pepper.  Lower the heat to medium and continue to stir and cook gently for about 5 minutes, until hot and thickened.  Using a potato masher, roughly mash the lentils a little so that some are broken up and you get a thick porridge consistency.

Spread the lentils on a flat serving plate and sprinkle with the onion, the remaining cilantro and a final drizzle of olive oil.  Serve warm with the hard-boiled eggs alongside and a sprinkle of paprika.

Serves two (as main course or four as starter)

(Cook's note - another place to use the roasted sunflower seed butter in place of the tahini.  Think of this as an option to traditional hummus.  I've also made this with the tiny, black lentils.  German brown lentils (the most commonly found kind) don't have as pleasant a taste as the Puy lentils.)

Comment

Upper Arm Classes

Comment

Upper Arm Classes

Schedule: Upper Arm Classes on the endangered list! 

Attention! 

Upper Arm Classes are in danger of becoming extinct! The Monday 9am-10am class and Friday 11am-12pm class both are on the endangered list due to lack of participation. Please let us know if you are interested in these classes and unable to attend for any reason (i.e. time conflict) and we will try to make adjustments.

For the rest of the schedule, if there are any other changes you'd like to see (time, instructor, instruction) please let us know either in person or through an email and again we will try to accommodate any requests made. 

A few updates have been made to the schedule so be sure to take a look below! 

Comment

Comment

Busting a Pilates Myth: You have to be flexible to take Pilates.

Busting A Pilates Myth #2

You have to be flexible to take Pilates.”

As we have said before the great thing about Pilates and our amazing team at the Pilates Studio of Salida is that we can tailor the movements to meet your needs. Our professionals check in with you as class is happening and then adapt the movements if needed. We are happy to discuss your needs, develop goals and encourage you to be your best. 


Comment

Recipe: Slow Cooker Spiced Chicken

Comment

Recipe: Slow Cooker Spiced Chicken

Slow Cooker Spiced Chicken

365 Slow Cooker Recipes by Stephanie O'Dea

  • 1 4lb roaster chicken, cleaned (you can do skin on or off)
  • 1 T salt
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground thyme
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp ground sage
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp powdered ginger
  • 1/4 tsp marjoram (I substitute chervil or basil, since this isn't in the spice rack)
  • 1/4 tsp celery seed
  • 1/4 tsp cardamom

Use a 6-quart slow cooker.  Rub the chicken all over (inside and out) with the spice blend.  Place breast side down in the cooker insert.  Do not add liquid. (Really!! It works!) Cover and cook on high for 4 hours or low 6-7 hours. Retain the pan drippings to make rice or mashed taters (or soup stock). Check the temp of the bird is 165 before serving.

(Cook's note - if you're going to go to the trouble of mixing up the spices, make a big batch and keep in a glass container.  That way you have it when you want a flavorful rub for poultry, fish, etc.  Soup made with stock from this is really good, too!)

 

**Let us know how you like it by commenting below! 

Comment

Recipe: Seaweed, Ginger and Carrot Salad

Comment

Recipe: Seaweed, Ginger and Carrot Salad

Seaweed, Ginger and Carrot Salad

  • 1-1/4 oz seaweed (hijiki is good - want something cut into thin strips)
  • 2" piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into very thin strips
  • 3 medium carrots, peeled and cut into very thin matchsticks
  • 5 T rice vinegar
  • 1 T superfine sugar
  • 1 lg. cucumber, peeled, quartered lengthwise, seeded and cut into very thin strips
  • 1 lg. mango, peeled and cut into very thin strips
  • 2/3 c toasted, salted peanuts, coarsely chopped
  • 2 T sesame seeds, toasted
  • 2 tsp lime juice
  • 1 T peanut oil
  • 1-1/3 c cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 2/3 c mint leaves, shredded
  • salt
  •  

Start by rinsing seaweed in water, drain and then cover generously with cold water.  Set aside for 30 minutes.

Bring large pot of water to boil.  Drain the seaweed and add it to the boiling water along with the ginger.  Boil for 2 minutes then add the carrots.  Boil for another 2 minutes, drain and immediately pat dry.  Transfer to a large bowl and immediately add the vinegar, sugar and 1-1/4 tsp salt.  Mix well and leave aside to cool.

Once the mixture is cool and you are ready to serve, add the cucumber, mango, peanuts, sesame seeds, lime juice, oil, cilantro and mint and stir to mix well.

Serves six.

(Cook's note - try to find a non-seasoned rice vinegar - Eden Organic makes a great brown rice vinegar.  Much tastier than what you find at Safeway.)

To toast sesame seeds, place in preheated pan over medium heat, stirring constantly until they start to brown. Remove from pan immediately.

Comment

Busting a Pilates Myth: Pilates is for Women Only

Comment

Busting a Pilates Myth: Pilates is for Women Only

Busting a Pilates Myth

#1 “Pilates is mostly for women.”

While it is true women who try Pilates love it, it was not designed just for them. Pilates was developed by a man and was made so everyone could enjoy it. Many male athletes have discovered the benefits of adding Pilates to their workout regimen.  Some men may think that Pilates won’t be rigorous enough for them and are surprised by how a class can work muscles they rarely use, strengthen their core and make them sweat. Great instructors can adapt movements to make them work best for men or for women. 

Comment

Equipment for Sale!

Comment

Equipment for Sale!

We are selling some equipment! Call, email, or just stop by if you are interested. 

  • 3 (boxed) 65cm exercise balls (anti-burst)
  • 3 (boxed) 75cm exercise balls (anti-burst)
  • 2 (inflated) 55cm exercise balls
  • 3 (inflated) 65cm balls
  • 2 ball pumps
  • 4-tier ball rack
  • 9 mats (1/2” thick)
  • 7 foam rollers (6 medium density/white; 1 black extra-firm)
  • 1 foot corrector
  • 1 Pilates arc (step barrel) with manual
  • 1 rotator disc (15”)
  • 2 magic circles
  • 1 step platform with 6 risers
  • 1-4lb. Spri bar
  • 1-8lb kettlebell
  • 1-5 lb kettlebell
  • 1-5lb ball (soft) with handle
  • 1-2lb ball
  • 2-10lb dumbbells
  • 2-8lb dumbbells
  • 2-5lb dumbbells
  • 4-3lb dumbbells
  • 9 yoga blocks (7 large/2 medium)
  • 3 ankle weights (appx 10lbs) – 2 with removable weights
  • Assorted pieces/lengths/weights Therabands – some black
  • 2 purple spiky half-balls (for balance)
  • 1 red balance wedge (typically used in sitting – can be used in standing)
  • 1 blue wedge (for wrists or elevating heels)
  • 1 soft ball (basketball-sized)
  • 6 black webbing stretching bands (with loops at both ends)
  • 2 sets sliding discs with connecting webbing

Comment

Free Shakeology Tasting this Monday!

Comment

Free Shakeology Tasting this Monday!

 

Correction! Tasting is Monday the 9th!

Carrie Robertson is teaming up with The Pilates Studio to offer free samples of shakeology shakes this Monday, March 9th at 1pm and 5pm. If you've been wondering if this program would be a good fit for you, this is the time to try it out! 

Monday, march 9th
1pm & 5pm

 

For more information on shakeology and this program, visit our information page:

http://www.salidapilatesstudio.com/pilates-boost/

Comment

Recipe: Lentil Minestrone

Comment

Recipe: Lentil Minestrone

Need some culinary inspiration? you're in luck! We'll be providing a new recipe here and there from Sonia's hand-picked tried and true favorites. 

Lentil Minestrone

by Deborah Madison, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, published 1997

  • 2 T olive oil, plus extra virgin to finish
  • 2 c finely chopped onion
  • 2 T tomato paste
  • 1/4 c chopped parsley
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 1 c diced celery or celery root
  • 1 c French (Puy) green lentils, sorted and rinsed
  • Aromatics: 2 bay leaves, 8 parsley branches, 6 thyme sprigs
  • 9 c water or vegetable stock
  • Mushroom soy sauce to taste (I usually use tamari)
  • 1 bunch greens - mustard, spinach, chard, broccoli rabe or the ubiquitous kale
  • 2 c cooked small pasta
  • Thin shavings of Parmesan, preferable Parmigiano-Reggiano

Heat the oil in a wide soup pot with the onion.  Saute over high heat, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 10 minutes.  Add the tomato paste, parsley, garlic, vegetables and 2 tsp salt and cook 3 minutes more. Add the lentils, aromatics, water (or stock) and bring to a boil.  Lower the heat and simmer, partially covered, for 30 minutes.  Taste for salt and season with pepper.  If it needs more depth, add mushroom soy sauce to taste, starting with 1 T. (Sometimes a splash of vinegar is good, too). The soup may seem bland at this point, but the flavors will come together when the soup is finished.  Remove the aromatics.

Boil the greens in salted water until they're tender and bright green, then chop them coarsely.  Just before serving, add the greens and pasta to the soup and heat through.  Serve with extra virgin olive oil drizzled into each bowl, a generous grind of pepper and the Parmesan.

Comment

Sleep & Pilates

Comment

Sleep & Pilates

What Do Pilates and Sleep Have in Common?

The answer is quiet a bit. Getting more ZZZs might be as simple as coming to our classes. We all know how terrible we feel trying to make it through the day after a restless night’s sleep. What if a simple routine of doing some exercise a couple of times per week could help? A preliminary study in the Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies (2013; 17, 5-10) reported that healthy, inactive adults who participated in 2 - one hour Pilates mat classes a week for 12 weeks reported better sleep and quality of life.  The participants reported better depth as well as quality of sleep.  So get yourself into a few Pilates classes and see what a difference it can make for you.

Yellow Feather Photography

Comment

Review Us!

Comment

Review Us!

If you've had a great experience with Pilates, let us know! We'd love to share what you have to say on our website and social networks. 

Testimonials

We need testimonials to put on our new website. If you're interested, please send us a paragraph or two about your experience with our studio and Pilates in general. 

You can email testimonials to salidapilatesstudio@gmail.com 

Reviews

Google +:

We'd love to have more reviews through Google. It can be as easy as clicking 1-5 stars or writing a few sentences about your experience. 

First go to our Google + page: https://plus.google.com/+PilatesStudioSalida

You'll need a Google + account if you don't already. It is easy to create one within 10 seconds if not. 

Under our logo and contact information there is a pencil icon, click on that to write a review. 

Click the pencil icon in the lower left hand side of the box to write a review. 

Click the pencil icon in the lower left hand side of the box to write a review. 

That is it! 

We are thrilled to be working with you and thank you for your time in reviewing what we do at The Pilates Studio!

 

 

Comment

How to Outsmart Your Willpower

Comment

How to Outsmart Your Willpower

It is that time of year, the time when many of us who made New Years Resolutions start to question whether or not it is really worth it to keep on our new diet and exercise routines. Or if we are staying on them, how we might be able to “cheat” just a little here or there.

 

Well now is the perfect time to talk about willpower and how to keep up you newly forming healthy habits. Anne Marie O’Connor talked about how to “Outsmart your Willpower” in a recent issue of Pilates Style Magazine. She says the key is not counting calories, mindful eating or even outright denying yourself foods you love but to use our willpower wisely as we go through our day! She spoke with Brian Wansink, PhD, a professor of marketing, the director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University and the author of Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions. He said, “For 90 percent of us, the solution to mindless eating is not mindful eating—our lives are just too crazy, and our willpower’s just too wimpy,” says Wansink. “Each of us makes more than 200 nearly subconscious food choices every day—soup or salad? A little or a lot? Finish it or leave it? We’re nudged more by our eating environment and things like 100-calorie packs than by our deliberate choices.” Having studied people’s eating habits for more than 20 years, Wansink has concluded that “the key is to make a few changes in our food radius [the places where we spend the most time, including work and home], so we can mindlessly eat better. “Once you’ve made the right changes to your eating environment,” he points out, “you’ll start eating better without thinking about it. You can make healthy choices even when your brain’s on autopilot.” By implementing these 25 tips, the culmination of years of research that he’s compiled in Slim by Design, you can start losing weight effortlessly.

#1 Keep food out of sight (and out of mind) except for produce. If you see it you are more likely to eat it or crave it. One of Wansink’s studies found that women who kept chips on the counter weighed eight more pounds than women who didn’t. But as irresistible as chips are, there’s an even more dangerous food to keep out: breakfast cereal. In Wansink’s study, women who stored
 it on the counter weighed a whopping 21 more pounds than women who didn’t. So why was cereal even more of a problem than chips? Wansink believes that it’s because that while everyone knows chips are a diet disaster, cereal has a “health halo,” especially when the box is covered with claims like “whole grain” and “good source of protein.” The moral: Keep everything but fruits and vegetables behind closed doors.

#2 Don’t make your kitchen a hangout. Wansink reports that when people made their kitchen less lounging- friendly—by moving out things like comfy chairs, TVs and iPads—they spent 18 fewer minutes a day there, making them less likely to mindlessly munch on sugary and salty snacks.

#3 Pick your plate’s color wisely.  It sounds wacky, but it’s true—the color of your dishes can subtly affect how much you eat. In one of Wansink’s studies, he found that people who served food on a dish that was the same color as what they were eating downed 18 percent more. Having pasta with marinara for dinner? Don’t serve it on a red plate. And don’t put linguine with clam sauce in a white bowl.

#4 Use “skinny” dishes. The size of your plate matters, too. A two-ounce serving of pasta will look huge on a 10-inch plate, but tiny on a 12-inch one. Which means we’ll probably serve ourselves more to “fill” the plate, or feel we deserve seconds since we only ate a “tiny” portion the first round.

#5 Shrink your drink. Is your daily glass of wine starting to look like a Big Gulp? Enjoy your libation without feeling like you’re denying yourself by serving all types of vino in white wine glasses. They’re taller than red wine glasses, so the glass will look fuller. (This trick works better when you’re sitting down and looking at it from eye level.)

#6 See red. In studies, participants poured themselves about 
9 percent less wine when they were drinking a Bordeaux or Pinot Noir than a Chardonnay. You can see red wine in the glass more clearly, so it looks like you’re drinking more.

#7 Avoid the fat clubs.  Yes, the keg-sized jar of
peanut butter for $5 or the 48- pack of mini quiches for a buck
 may be mouthwatering deals. But even though you may be saving money, you may be enlarging your waistline. “Once you get the forklift home, those bargains turn into a burden for your cupboards—and your diet,” says Wansink. In studies, he found that people who filled their cupboards (and pantries,
 and garages, and basements) with warehouse-store purchases ate
 half of what they bought in the 
first week—and ate it twice as fast as they normally would. Still stuck on Costco? Try repackaging your bounty into single-sized servings, advises Wansink.

#8 Make your pantry and “inconvenience” store.  Wansink doesn’t believe in denying ourselves our favorite treats, but he does advise dieters to make it less convenient to eat mindlessly. By moving the pantry away from the kitchen (by relocating it
to the garage or the basement, for instance), you’ll be less likely 
to grab a snack every time the thought crosses your mind. In his studies, he’s found that if you have to make a trek to get something to eat, you’re more likely to think twice before mindlessly devouring a handful of nuts or cookies.

#9 Avoid the Mother Hubbard syndrome.  Just because your cupboard is bare doesn’t mean it’s diet-friendly, or that you’ll never overindulge. It sounds counterintuitive, but Wansink found that if there’s nothing in the house to eat, you’ll probably order in or get takeout. He discovered that people who do order rarely phone in just a snack, no matter how hungry they are; instead they get a whole meal. So even if you would have been satisfied with a 140-calorie yogurt, you’ll end up ordering—and eating—a 500-calorie tuna sandwich. If you hate to cook, at least stock up on healthy, easy-to- prepare foods like yogurt, eggs, fat-free milk, string cheese, sliced turkey, canned soup and pre-cut vegetables and fruit.

#10 Serve meals Downton Abbey-style. Take a cue from the Earl of Grantham’s household and don’t allow the serving dishes to be set on the table. (No butler? We don’t have one, either. Leave the serving bowls and platters in the kitchen.) Wansink found that people ate 23 percent less when food was dished up directly from the stovetop or the counter onto plates, and then brought to the table. (This also made diners reconsider whether they really wanted seconds, not just mindlessly help themselves.)

#11 Try the 3 bites trick. Craving chocolate or some chips? Try this ruse: Take two or three bites, then put away the 
treat and do something else for 10 or 15 minutes (write a few emails, water the plants). In one of his studies, Wansink found that people who had just three bites and then stopped were satisfied and didn’t want any more—if they distracted themselves afterward.

#12 Make a snack pact. Tell yourself you’ll eat a piece of fruit or a glass of water before you indulge in a treat. By forcing yourself to do something healthy instead of just shoveling chips in your mouth or wolfing down the leftover ravioli, chances are you’ll eat less and you won’t just devour something robotically.

#13 Remind yourself to eat more fruit. Placing a fruit bowl
 on your counter will encourage everyone in the family to eat more apples, bananas, oranges and pears, Wansink has found. Filling it with two or more types of fruits will make it even more likely that people will help themselves, as will placing it within two feet of the busiest kitchen pathway.

#14 Buy a diet friendly refrigerator. Your fridge can have a big effect on your “bottom” line. The skinniest refrigerator style is one with the freezer on the bottom and the fridge on the top, Wansink says. This makes it more likely fruits and vegetables will be the first things you spot when you open the door.

#15 Make your fridge a healthy zone. Wansink advises putting the healthiest snacks (berries, cut fruit and carrots, peppers and broccoli florets) in the front of the center shelf, which makes them easy to see them when you open the door. Keep other fruits and vegetables (salad greens, cooked vegetables) in clear plastic bags or see-through containers, so they’re easy to spot, too.

#16 Hide the calorie bombs.  Disguise fattening foods by storing leftovers in opaque containers or aluminum foil. Put leftover dessert in the bottom produce drawer, so you’re not tempted every time you open the refrigerator.

#17 In a restaurant, ask for a table with a view.  Sit by the window or in a well-lit part of the restaurant—people who did ordered healthier options, according to Wansink’s research.
He adds that it seems that people who sat farthest away from the front door ate fewer salads and were 73 percent more likely to order dessert.

#18 Belly back from the bar.  Don’t sit too close to the bar area. Wansink found that people who sat within two tables of the bar drank an average of three more beers or mixed drinks (per table of four) than those sitting even just one table farther away.

#19 Freebies can cost big calories.  Tell the waiter to hold the bread or chips (or other “giveaway”) at the start of the meal. You won’t be tempted if they’re not there.

#20 Look for healthy keywords on the menu. Not sure what to order? Wansink found that foods described as seasoned, roasted or marinated had 60 fewer calories than other entrées.

#21 Learn to spot code words for “fattening.” Steer clear of foods with these words: buttery, creamed, crispy, crunchy, smothered, Alfredo, white sauce, fried/deep-fried/pan- fried, scampi and loaded. They are always more caloric, Wansink says.

#22 Consult an expert. Sure, the tree-bark
 salad is low in calories, but when you go out to eat, you
 want something healthy and delicious. Wansink’s advice? “Ask your server, ‘What
 are the two or three lighter entrées that get the most compliments?’ or ‘What is the best thing on the menu for someone who wants a light dinner?’”

#23 Go half-sies. Ask your server—or the restaurant manager—if they serve half portions of entrées. If they don’t, ask to have half of the entrée put in a doggie bag before they bring it to the table.

#24 Check out the menu before you go. When choosing a place 
to eat, look up the menu online first, so you can make a decision when you’re
 not hungry and won’t give in to impulse. Wansink recommends looking for 
a place that offers at least three healthy appetizers and three healthy entrées.

#25 Take a tour of the buffet before you serve yourself.  Wansink’s research showed that slim diners “scouted” out a salad bar or buffet before they even picked up a plate; instead of piling on food without a plan, they helped themselves to just what they wanted.

Thank you to PilatesStyle.com for allowing us to reprint portions of this article.

 

 

 

Comment

Comment

Schedule Update

Class Cancelation:

Mat Class on Tuesday January 13th is CANCELLED

There will be classes that pm. 

Vacation:

Steve & Sonia will be on vacation February 17th-20th. Please check to see what classes will be covered by other instructors during that time. 

Stay active and warm out there! 

Comment

Comment

Food for Thought

//The Pilates Studio aims to educate and support those in their search for wellness. We offer these articles and viewpoints as a means for discussion and thought, not strictly held principles.//

 

Watching television and eating are a deadly duo for people seeking good health. Not only is TV viewing sedentary, but eating while watching tends to be mindless and we consume more without really knowing it.

Now, new research shows there may well be a TV-watching-and-eating triple threat. The type of television programming you choose may also be impacting your waistline, say authors of a research letter published September 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine (doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.4098).

Researchers found that participants who watched an excerpt from a Hollywood action film on television ate a greater volume of snacks than those who watched an interview program.

The authors wanted to know how objective technical characteristics, such as the frequency of visual camera cuts or variations in sound, might influence food consumption. The study included 94 undergraduate students (57 female; mean age nearly 20). The young women gathered in groups to watch 20 minutes of TV and were randomly assigned to one of three different programs: an excerpt from The Island, a Hollywood action movie; the interview program Charlie Rose; or the identical excerpt from The Island, but with no sound.

Viewers snacked on M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching. The snacks were weighed before and after the program to track how much viewers had eaten.

Students watching the more distracting program, The Island, with its high number of camera cuts and sound variations, ate 98% more grams of food and 65% more calories than viewers who watched Charlie Rose. Even viewers of the silent version of The Island ate 36% more grams of food and 46% more calories than Charlie Rose viewers.

“More distracting TV content appears to increase food consumption: action and sound variation are bad for one’s diet. The more distracting a TV show, the less attention people appear to pay to eating, and the more they eat,” wrote authors Aner Tal, PhD, MBA, Scott Zuckerman, MD, and Brian Wansink, PhD.

Comment

Comment

Help Give Books to Salida's Children

Salida's Sunrise Rotary Club is bringing Dolly Parton's Imagination Library to Salida School District. 

What is it? 

Dolly Parton's Imagination Library is a 60 volume set of books that begins with the children's classic The Little Engine That Could. Each month a new, age-appropriate book is mailed in the child's name directly to his or her home. Best of all, it is a free gift to the child, and there is no cost or obligation to the family. All students within Salida School District R-32-J are eligible starting at birth until their fifth birthday. 

What are the Benefits of this Program? 

Many studies have shown that money invested in the early literacy skills of our young children has a far-reaching impact. When parents read books to their children from birth, it provides them with the best possible start. Children develop literacy skills long before being able to read, and it is important to start at birth. 

Through the generous donations of individuals and organizations, the program can: 

  • Promote and encourage a love of reading among children.
  • Help ensure that children enter kindergarten with a strong ability to read and an eagerness to learn.
  • Strengthen the literacy level of our community. 
  • Promote parent-child interaction and bonding. 
  • Provide free, high-quality, age-appropriate books to young children. 

What You can do: 

Please consider a contribution to support this program. A $25 donation covers the costs to mail a child a book each month for a year. 

Your donation will help provide the gift of reading to children from birth until their fifth birthday in the Salida School District, in our own community!

Salida Sunrise Rotary Charitable Fund, Inc. is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Your contribution is tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. 

You can send any donations to: 

Salida Sunrise Rotary Charitable Fund, Inc. 
944 E Rainbow Blvd., PMB 221
Salida, CO 81201

OR

Drop it off the next time you come into The Pilates Studio!  

 

 

Comment

Google+